F.O.O.D.

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Our daily greeds

Our daily greeds

Apart from kittens, food is the general obsession on most popular social media feeds where we see the collective taking the time to snap foodie shots of the perfect meal all the while knowing that your food is screaming at you to ‘eat me’. Yes, I am unshamefully one of them.

Usually these photos that I painstakingly and embarrassingly take at fancy restaurants or standing on the streets end up casted into a vault somewhere in my laptop, prepared to never see the light of day again.

Not today mi amigos. I thought I’d showcase some of my many delectable photos to recap some of my belly’s European memories to you.

Harvest from the in-laws. One could not ask for more

Harvest from the in-laws.

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The “Hamburger” style Schnitzel. I guess the German steak and eggs.

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Cheesecake baked by Opa. Afternoon cake and coffee is quite the ritual that must not be broken.

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Ham, sauerkraut and potato dumplings at one of our many lunch visits to Oma

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Prices of beer at the grocery store. As a comparison, bottled water costs about 0,70 euro.

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At the Currycult. Great fast-food eatery that specializes in Currywurst which is pork sausage cut into slices and is seasoned with curry ketchup. Sounds weird, but it’s addictive.

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We had this mini “Spritzkuchen” in Weimar. It’s a honey cruller and upon our arrival in Leipzig, our goal was to try every version of Spritzkuchens we came across.

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The German donair. It’s great street food for those who have an appetite. The paper-thin meat and the marinated cabbage combo makes the sandwich less heavy when biting into the freshly grilled flat-bread that contains all the goodness.

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“Leipziger Lerche” – is named after the singing lark. This pastry is a shortcrust filled with marzipan

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A classic grinder that we used to shave our bitter almonds for a classic Christmas cake.

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I learned that butter and fat comes in many varieties.

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Our “Stollen” – which is a fruit cake traditionally served during Christmas time in Germany.

Flammkuchen - literally translated 'flame-cake'. It's a savory flatbread baked in a fire-oven

Flammkuchen – literally translated ‘flame-cake’. It’s a savory flatbread baked in a fire-oven

Mulled-wine has a special place in my heart. People gather around on the streets drinking this to stay warm and merry in cool temperatures.

Mulled-wine has a special place in my heart. People gather around on the streets drinking this to stay warm and merry in cooler temperatures.

A foot long bratwurst. We just had to try it.

A foot long bratwurst. We just had to try it.

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Again proves no matter where you go, you will find a Chinese restaurant – Prague.

Great tasting pizza is not difficult to find and usually easy on the pocket as well.

Great tasting pizza is not difficult to find and usually easy on the pocket as well.

Baked stuffed bread that was once only found during festive events - but a genius decided to open his very own to not disappoint

Baked stuffed bread that was once only found during festive events – but a genius decided to open his very own and did not disappoint

White beer has become a drink of choice. Prost!

Wheat beer has become a drink of choice. Prost!

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Sanssouci Park in Potsdam

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Potsdam is located on the outskirts of Berlin and is yet another UNESCO World Heritage Site. I am beginning to notice that World Heritage Sites are quite common here because I think we drove past 4 sites within 15 minutes on the autobahn towards Potsdam.

Germany has a great system in that there are specific brown-coloured signs along the autobahn labelling the nearby attraction and a rough pictorial sketch of what you may get yourself into. These signs are posted all across the country to help drivers find and become aware of the history, culture, and land Germany has to offer. It was because of these signs we decided to visit Weimar a few weeks ago and it is perfect for the curious traveller with no agenda. The only travelling tip is if you prefer to drive over 140km/hr, you will likely miss these signs.

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The Sanssouci castle was the summer residence of Frederick the Great

This windmill was built in the Dutch style from 1787-91

This windmill was built in the Dutch style from 1787-91

Sanssouci literally means "without a care" in French. So much for taxpayers money

Sanssouci literally means “without a care” in French. So much for taxpayers money

New Palace at Sanssouci - but of course, only the finest for his guests

New Palace at Sanssouci – but of course, only the finest for his guests

A view from one of the many gardens in Sanssouci

A view from one of the many gardens in Sanssouci

If you look at the top of the of the photo, there is a faint reflections of the windmill. Job not well done.

If you look at the top of the of the photo, there is a faint reflection of the windmill. Job not very well done.

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I somehow found this sculpture – amongst the hundreds on the park grounds – to be very interesting. Can’t explain it.

Sanssouci was built by Frederick the Great and only took 2 years to build

Sanssouci was built by Frederick the Great and only took 2 years to build

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The birdies were a bonus

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The castle offers a breathtaking view from the top and is levelled with many tiers to present its grandness. At the base of the park grounds you will find many flowers including Echinaceas

“There is more culture in Europe”

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Salve means “to be well” or “Hi” in Latin. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe had this word engraved on the footstep of his home in Weimar to greet his guests

Salve means “to be well” or “Hi” in Latin. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe had this word engraved on the footstep of his home in Weimar to greet his guests

… Who doesn’t love Europe with their rich history, romantic buildings, ability to integrate the old world with new in everyday design and not to mention their adoring accents. We were discussing this with some new acquaintances at the tennis court last week and in light of us recently visiting the historic town of Weimar, Germany – a UNESCO world heritage site – it is quite true to agree that Europe indeed has more culture.

I took offence from the lady who suggested that to me. But being Canadian, the offence was only slight and it did take some afterthought to express in words why living in Canada is just as great. Maybe we don’t have records like Weimar dating back from year 899 and didn’t have the likes of Bach, Martin Luther and renaissance man Goethe walking around every corner. Nor is modernist architecture inspired by some of the greats – i.e. Bauhaus – our forte. But in my opinion, the North American culture is not just about boxed-up, cookie-cutter homes, chain businesses and ‘Flintstone’ sized products.

It is easy to find genuine friendly faces and growing local businesses with unique flair nowadays. And our knack for transforming (and embracing) an old idea into something different is uncanny. I mean, bratwurst chilli poppers with beer mustard just wouldn’t fly in the old country because that is “just not the way bratwursts are prepared” and you can forget about the Japadogs making it big here.

At the end of the day I find that one cannot compare the two cultures because they are diverse in many different levels. Instead we should simply embrace these differences and rejoice the fact that we will never stop learning from one another. People watching, eating oodles of cheese and taking advantage of the fantastic 5 Euro bottles of wine here have been my recent latest and greatest.